Pesach

Do all Jewish communities in the world celebrate Pesach in the same way?

How many Jewish communities in the world, how many Pesach customs. Most customs are related to Leil ha Seder. In Sephardic people it is a real spectacle. Apart from a beautifully set table, plenty of food and ceremonial clothes, the Sephardic people present the whole history of Pesach to children in theatrical form. In Persia, it was customary for one of the Seder participants to dress up in old clothes, drop a bag on their back and knock on the door of the Seder room. They opened it and asked him: where do you come from? From Egypt,” answered the wanderer and began to talk about the bad fate of Jews in Egypt. He told everything in a poem. Then they asked him: where are you going? To Jerusalem,” he answered. What do you have in your bag? The matzo I brought from Egypt… The dialogue lasted a long time.

A lot of pesach habits are connected with an afikoman. In the Ashkenazi, the father hides half the matzo after breaking it. The children try to steal it, and at the end of the meal, when the Afikoman should be eaten, they don’t give it back until Dad promises them a gift in return. There are municipalities where the presents are hidden behind the door and the children wait for them all night. Some people do that, although they know it’s a little Christian influence.

In Morocco, the Afikoman is considered a sign of happiness. It is believed, for example, that he protects against a storm. Everyone who goes out to sea wants to have it, because during a storm, it is enough to throw a piece of the afikoman into the sea and the storm calms itself. As a sign of luck, salt is also poured into clothing pockets.

In the Caucasus, on the other hand, where women never reveal their faces, during the seder, they sit at the table exceptionally with their faces uncovered. They are not afraid of the presence of other families and unknown guests, because the Seder night is a special night, it is Leil Shimurim and nothing bad can happen, because all the participants of the Seder are under the protection of God.

During the Seder, after Birkat Hamazon we open the door. This is because Leil Shimurim does not end, it continues. Others say that this is to show that we are waiting for Eliahu Anawi, who is already close. In Bukhara, when you open the door after the seder is finished, someone is behind the door. He comes in and everyone asks: who are you? Eliahu Anawi, the guest answers, I came to save you. And he starts telling us what will happen when the Massiii comes.

The whole Seder night is basically dedicated to the young generation. We do everything to make sure that the children participate. For this reason, Haggadah has always been spoken in the local language: Arabic, Russian, English and even Polish. We also do funny things to make children like it more and to make them play. In many Municipalities the whole Haggadah was sung in Yiddish, or spoken in a poem like a poem.

There are different eating habits on Pesach. There is a minhag to eat an egg with salted iharoset water. In Yemen you don’t eat eggs during the Seder (like everywhere else), but in huge quantities you eat during the remaining days of Pesach. In Ashkenazi, on the other hand, Ashkenazi people often eat soup together with matzo flour dumplings. However, in Hasidic Jews it was forbidden. Hasidim did not eat matzah together with a drink, because they were afraid that there was some flour in it, which was not well baked and it would become a booze. They did not even fold the plates one on top of the other, because they were afraid that this would also make a chametz. Some Hasidic people do not eat matzah with the rest of the meal but separately. In Yemen they have a custom that when singing the song “Chajenu” all the participants of the Seder carry the table with their hands and lower it when saying “dajenu”.

Another interesting custom: in Libya, gold coins are thrown into a candlestick (on which a woman lights candles) as a sign of peace and happiness. They are also thrown into oil containers, which are sometimes used instead of candles. Gold coins are also placed in the corners of the room.
The matzo that we know is a kreker matzo. There are other types of matzo. Sephardicans, for example, make it a kind of drunken matzo: thick and soft. In Bukhara, matzos are round and small. In Yemen, they bake

the mace before Pesach and also during Pesach to have them always fresh. A peculiar custom prevails in Georgia. There it is made mishloach manot, just like during Purim. Three portions of matzo and three hard-boiled eggs are offered for banknotes. The last day of Pesach is called mimuna. For this day, the Moroccans decorate their homes green and eat only milk dishes. The most frequently printed book of all generations of Jews is Haggadah in Pesach. In each country it is illustrated according to local associations. There is also the Haggadah ha Ziporim, where people have faces of birds.

Some people do so, although they know that it is a little Christian influence.
The whole Seder Night is basically dedicated to the young generation. We do everything to make sure that children participate in it. For this reason, Haggadah has always been spoken in the local language: Arabic, Russian, English and even Polish. We also do funny things to make children like it more and to make them play. In Algeria, for example, it is customary for the leader Seder to show the keora and then put the keora together with the matzo and four wine cups on the head of each feaster.
In many municipalities the whole Haggadah in Yiddish was sung, or spoken in a poem like a poem.
There are different customs for eating on Pesach. There is a minchag to eat an egg with salted water and haroset. In Yemen one eats eggs during Seder (like everywhere else), while in huge quantities one eats during the remaining days of Pesach.
In Ashkenazi, on the other hand, Ashkenazi people often eat soup together with macaroni flour dumplings. In the Chasidim, however, it was prohibited. The Hasidim did not eat matzah together with a drink, because they were afraid that there was some flour in the soup, which was not baked well and it would become boorish. They did not even fold the plates one on top of the other, because they were afraid that this would also make a chametz. Some Hasidic Jews don’t eat macy with the rest of the meal. Only separately.
In Yemen they have a custom that when singing the song “Khaimen” all the participants of Seder should raise the table with their hands and lower it when saying “dajen”.
It is known that the most frequently printed book of all generations is Hagada. In each country it is illustrated according to local associations. There is also known Haggadah ha Ziporim, in which people have faces of birds.
Another interesting custom: in Libya, gold coins are thrown into a candlestick (on which a woman lights candles) as a sign of peace and happiness. They are also thrown into oil containers, which are sometimes used instead of candles. The gold coins shall be placed

There are municipalities where you hide gifts for children behind the door and children wait for them all night. Some do so, although they know it’s a little Christian influence.
The whole Night of Seder is basically dedicated to the young generation. We do everything to make sure that the children participate in it. For this reason, Haggadah has always been spoken in the local language: Arabic, Russian, English and even Polish. We also do funny things to make children like it more and to make them play. In Algeria, for example, it is customary for the leader Seder to show the keora and then put the keora together with the matzo and four wine cups on the head of each feaster.

In many Municipalities, the whole Haggadah in Yiddish was sung, or spoken in a poem like a poem.
There are different customs for eating on Pesach. There is a minchag to eat an egg with salted water and haroset. In Yemen one eats eggs during Seder (like everywhere else), while in huge quantities one eats during the remaining days of Pesach.
In Ashkenazi, on the other hand, Ashkenazi people often eat soup together with macaroni flour dumplings. In the Chasidim, however, it was prohibited. The Hasidim did not eat matzah together with a drink, because they were afraid that there was some flour in the soup, which was not baked well and it would become boorish. They did not even fold the plates one on top of the other, because they were afraid that this would also make a chametz. Some Hasidic Jews don’t eat macy with the rest of the meal. Only separately.
In Yemen they have a custom that when singing the song “Khaimen” all the participants of Seder should raise the table with their hands and lower it when saying “dajen”.
It is known that the most frequently printed book of all generations is Hagada. In each country it is illustrated according to local associations. There is also known Haggadah ha Ziporim, in which people have faces of birds.
Another interesting custom: in Libya, gold coins are thrown into a candlestick (on which a woman lights candles) as a sign of peace and happiness. They are also thrown into oil containers, which are sometimes used instead of candles. The gold coins shall be placed